Do

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How did that billionaire get to where she is today? She loved herself enough to believe in herself and what she decided to do every day. 

More importantly, she didn’t think too much. 

Do yourself a favor. Don’t think too much. According to Yuval Harari our brains account for only 2-3% of our body weight, but use roughly 25% of our bodies’ energy when we are at rest (i.e. staring at the phone prior to a cold call)… thinking too much can make you extremely tired. This is no joke. If you spend too much thinking, thinking, thinking, grinding yourself down with internal bullshit stories, you will wear yourself out and have no energy left for doing what you need to do. 

No one ever succeeded by thinking 90% of the time. That famous entrepreneur? She did the work that needed to be done. 

What is the work?

Just make a list and do what needs to be done. 

Make a list of what you need to do. If you have a spouse or a friend who you trust, tell them you are having trouble getting out of your own way… And ask them to help you by dispassionately and objectively identifying what a person in your position or role needs to do to succeed. 

Then make the list of those things, then do them. Don’t think about it. 

Then, when you’re done each day, give yourself a pat on the back for doing what needs to be done. You’re on your way to succeeding. 

One other thing. Bill Gates supposedely said, “Most people overestimate what they can accomplish in a year, and underestimate what they can accomplish in 10 years.” — Definitely true. 

If you can do the work, each day, over time the work will add up to a lot, even though the pats on the back may seem trivial in the short term. The image above shows what happens to $10,000 invested at a compounded annual interest rate of 17% for 10 years.