4 Ways to Overcome Fear as a Solopreneur

4 Ways to Overcome Fear as a Solopreneur

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Starting a venture as a solopreneur can be synonymous with overcoming fear. Whether it’s a side hustle or meant to be a full time business, starting a new business is frightening.

This is because you’re venturing out on your own and testing your idea, which could fail.

The fear can’t be beaten because it is in built into your DNA…

However, here are four things that you can do to overcome fear and make it less paralyzing

1) Be Honest With Yourself About What You Want:

Be totally honest about what you want to do… And don’t worry about being “selfish”.

If you are not hurting anyone by doing what you’re doing, then there’s nothing wrong with it.

And, if you are dreaming of something on a consistent basis, that’s a good sign that it’s important to you.

Don’t ignore this calling. Ignoring it will only make you feel miserable.

Being honest with yourself reduces fear because it provides the truest and strongest foundation from which to build something.

2) Make Some Progress Every Day

If you are working a full time day job and you want to do something else, start working on that other thing. Find time on the side, before work, after work, on weekends, etc.

The important thing is to do. Don’t think.

Do.

Do something everyday to get your idea out in the real world.

Create an anonymous blog and start writing about your ideas. Test the idea by publishing posts about it, promoting it and being open to feedback.

When ready, try to sell a productized version of your idea if you can.

If no one buys it, try to get feedback and make adjustments as needed.

Making progress every day reduces fear because you have gotten out of your head and done something.

3) Don’t Focus on Goals

Focusing on goals can set you up for failure… Instead work toward creating a sustainable system that allows you to do #2 (make incremental progress).

Many people will tell you that you need pursue specific goals, but this can be bad advice.

Scott Adams, creator of the Dilbert cartoon, is probably the one who’s most famous, and perhaps successful, by promoting this as a strategy in his book “How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big”.

Your plan vs. reality

If you are starting out you are likely to be too aggressive in your goals, and be disappointed when you fail to reach them.

Or you may underestimate your goals make them too easy and never learn anything new.

Instead of creating an arbitrary goal, try to develop a sustainable system that will carry you through life, not just your business plans.

A system is something that you can use and iterate on forever, but goals are meant to be beaten.

The most valuable businesses on Earth are valuable because of their systems, not the goals they achieve.

Not focusing on goals, and creating a system, can reduce fear because the wrong goal can result in a setback you may never recover from.

4) Take 100% Responsibility For Everything

Whatever happens, think of the result as having a positive outcome. And take responsibility for it.

Idea failed? Good, it’s time to find a better idea. No one bought? Good, let’s improve the marketing. System not working? Good, let’s create a better one… One that can be implemented and repeated.

By taking 100% responsibility for everything. This means not blaming anyone else or anything else for your situation.

This strategy addresses #1, being honest with yourself, and provides you with a foundation from which to measure your success.

Taking 100% responsibility reduces fear because by taking 100% responsibility for everything, you will be accountable.

And as you overcome small obstacles you are accountable for, the larger ones will start to fall too. Each success builds upon prior successes, no matter how small.